OpenJDK 11 on Fedora

Interesting in running the current version of Java (and its compiler) on your Fedora instance? It’s easy:

sudo dnf install java-11-openjdk-devel
sudo alternatives --config java # select Java 11
sudo alternatives --config javac # if necessary, select java 11

Note that this is still labeled as the “early access” version as of this writing – but the early access version is virtually identical to the released version.

The JavaChannel Podcast, Episode XVII (17)

The XVIIth podcast is live! … one wonders why the Roman Empire didn’t last much longer, doesn’t one. One also wonders how long one can refer to oneself in the whatever-person this is. (It’s… second-person? No, folks, it’s “third person.” English grammer fumbling and lesson over.)
In this podcast, we chase a few things: the discussion topic centers back around on Python vs. Java, and why one might encounter one over the other in certain situations.
We also jump down the gullets of a lot of varied topics, only some of which are Java, but most are at least sort-of relevant:

  • Expanded switch statements in java! … Stuff we can look forward to in Java 12. Java’s looking more and more like Kotlin all the time.
  • Hibernate with Kotlin – powered by Spring Boot describes, of all things, using Kotlin, Hibernate, and Spring Boot together. (The summary has a good laundry list of things to pay attention to.)
  • Another Java Enhancement Proposal: the Java Thread Sanitizer. It would provide a dynamic data race detector implementation for Java and native JNI code utilizing ThreadSanitizer in OpenJDK with interpreter and C1 support… and while it’s great that tools like this might exist, it’s fantastic that they’re apparently rarely needed if they show up twenty years after Java’s release.
  • The Left Hand of Equals is not strictly java related, but still interesting. It mostly centers around what it means for one object to be equal to another. I wonder if the channel blog should have recommended LINKS as well as books….
  • TomEE: Running with Systemd is a pretty fair walkthrough, and should be applicable to other app servers as well… that is, if appservers are still relevant in the world where microservice containers do be existin, mon.
  • https://brilliant.org/ is a kinda neat site for math and logic skills. If you use it, don’t forget to take the question surveys, because that’s how it’ll improve.
  • How to Be a Person Who Can Make a Damn Decision is the first of at least two annoying links for Andrew – this one says it’s “how to be a person who can” but actually mostly documents people being those kinds of people. We also have the resurgence of the podcast drinking game; take a shot whenever game theory is mentioned. However, the article doesn’t really have a lot of takeaways, apart from pointing out that the ability to make a decision quickly is probably a worthwhile skill to have.
  • OpenPDF 1.2.1 has been released. Joe didn’t even know about this library. No idea how useful it is; this release doesn’t look like a big one from the surface, but still: the more libraries out there, the merrier, right? (Unless they’re logging libraries.)
  • 7 Scientific Benefits of Reading Printed Books is the second annoying link for Andrew. It goes over some, uh, tenuous reasons print books are worth reading, some of which were taken exception to. Joe thought it was worth thinking about when e-books are ALL the rage for programming topics…
  • Other tangential topics:
    • https://hmijailblog.blogspot.com/2018/08/you-could-have-invented-lmax-disruptor.html I hated reading this, so I stopped.
    • https://perens.com/2018/08/22/new-intel-microcode-license-restriction-is-not-acceptable/ Apparently Intel was saying not to publish benchmarks, which is kinda gross. However, worth noting is that after the initial scraping of this article, Intel backed down and changed the police. Way to go, Bruce Perens!

The JavaChannel Podcast, vol 16

It’s only been six months, so it’s finally time for a new podcast. This one doesn’t even pretend to go over the mountains of killer content from ##java since the last podcast – it focuses on some of the more recent links, and that’s it. Well, apart from talking about the Java ecosystem a bit, especially in contrast with Python, an upstart language that’s making a lot of headway lately thanks to a giant upsurge in data science applications.


(A bit of irony: the very first paragraph in the podcast says it’s only been “four months” when it’s actually been six. Yikes.)


But there are some interesting links, and here are the ones the podcast focused on!



This was written with the new editor plugin for WordPress, called “Gutenberg.” It’s a lot like Medium.com’s editor. It’s effective for writing… unless you have any actual features you want in the text.


Gradle Properties

Gradle supports properties in builds just like Maven does, but the actual documentation and examples are harder to come by. This article will show you something that actually works.
In Maven, you typically have a dependencyManagement section that declares the dependencies with versions; I typically put the versions in a properties block so that they’re all located in a nice, handy, easy-to-manage place. See https://github.com/jottinger/ml/blob/master/pom.xml for a simple example; it’s not consistent with the property usage, but the idea should be clear. I have my versions all coalesced into an easy place to update them, and the changes propagate through the entire project.
Gradle examples rarely do anything like this. Therefore, for your edification, here’s a simple example:
gradle.properties:

aws_sdk_version=1.11.377
kotlin_version=1.2.50

build.gradle:

buildscript {
  repositories {
    mavenCentral()
  }
  dependencies {
    classpath "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-gradle-plugin:$kotlin_version"
  }
}
apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'kotlin'
repositories {
    mavenCentral()
    jcenter()
}
dependencies {
    compile "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-stdlib-jdk8"
    compile "com.amazonaws:aws-java-sdk:$aws_sdk_version"
}
tasks.withType(org.jetbrains.kotlin.gradle.tasks.KotlinCompile).all {
    kotlinOptions {
        jvmTarget = "1.8"
        javaParameters = true
    }
}

You can use a constraints block in the dependencies to do the same thing as dependencyManagement in Maven; that would look like this:

dependencies {
    constraints {
        implementation "com.amazonaws:aws-java-sdk:$aws_sdk_version"
    }
}

This would allow submodules (or this module) to use a simpler dependency declaration, leaving off the version, just like Maven can do:

dependencies {
    compile "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-stdlib-jdk8"
    compile "com.amazonaws:aws-java-sdk"
}

If you don’t want to use gradle.properties, that’s doable too (as pointed out by channel member matsurago) – you can put it in the buildscript block, as so:

buildscript {
  ext.aws_sdk_version="1.11.377"
}

Article on java.time

Channel denizen (yes, that’s what we call people in the ##java channel, “denizens”) yawkat has published “An introduction to java.time,” an article to try to clear up some of the confusion around the time API in Java: things like LocalTime, OffsetTime, and the like. If you’re still using Date, this article is for you. Includes handy ways to convert between the time types, and is likely to grow further at need.

JavaChannel’s Interesting Links podcast, episode 15

Welcome to the fifteenth ##java podcast. Your hosts are Joseph Ottinger, dreamreal on the IRC channel, and Andrew Lombardi (kinabalu on IRC) from Mystic Coders.
As always, this podcast is basically interesting content pulled from various sources, and funneled through the ##java IRC channel on freenode. You can find the show notes at the channel’s website, at javachannel.org; you can find all of the podcasts using the tag (or even “category”) “podcast”, and each podcast is tagged with its own identifier, too, so you can find this one by searching for the tag “podcast-15”.
Discussion today centered around specifications: any good ones out there? What would good specifications look like?

  1. A few podcasts ago (podcast 11) we mentioned “resilience4j” – well, there’s also retry4j on github. It’s another library that offers retry semantics. retry4j’s semantics are really clean; maybe it’s me (dreamreal), but it seems more in line with what I’d expect a retry library to look like.

  2. From Youtube, we have a video showing how to use Graal in the JVM. Graal exposes JVMTI internals – which means that theoretically you could write a replacement for the just-in-time compiler, and change some fundamental ways of how Java works. Twitter is using Graal today, and the presenter says that it works fantastically; it’s also slotted to become standard in the next few revisions of Java, so we’ll have it probably next month or so.

  3. From the channel blog itself, user yawkat posted a way to cache HTTP results regardless of response with OkHttp. Why is this important? Well, if you’re testing a crawler, it’s handy to not slam the target server – even on results that should give things like “not found.” It’s written in Kotlin; the Java code would be trivial (and maybe we should post it as well just for the sake of example) but it’s still pretty handy.

  4. There’s also a Java Enhancement Proposal to allow launching single-source-code files like “java File.java”, and it automatically invokes javac; also with support for shebang, so we could be looking at Java scripting before too long. Some people already do this with scripts; they have something that pipes Java source into a temporary file, compiles it, and runs it, but this would be more standardized.

  5. We’ve seen a few posts about Hibernate on the channel lately, including some about projections (where an object isn’t represented as such in the data model but is constructed on-the-fly). Vlad Mihalcea actually had an appropriate post about caching such projections.

  6. We also have seen references lately to Project Sumatra – GPU enablement for the JVM, which seems abandoned – and then there’s this from the valhalla developer’s list: there IS a GPU exploitation thing being worked on. Who knows, we might see highly-GPU-enabled JVMs or libraries innate for Java before long.

  7. DZone has an article called “Java Phasers Made Simple” – basically a set of limited-scope locks. It’s really well done although quite long; hard for it to go into detail without being fairly long, though, so that’s okay. Worthwhile read.

JavaChannel’s Interesting Links podcast, episode 14

Welcome to the fourteenth ##java podcast. Your hosts, as usual, are Joseph Ottinger, dreamreal on the IRC channel, and Andrew Lombardi from Mystic Coders (kinabalu on the channel), and it’s Wednesday, February 7, 2018.
As always, this podcast is basically interesting content pulled from various sources, and funneled through the ##java IRC channel on freenode. You can find the show notes at the channel’s website, at javachannel.org; you can find all of the podcasts using the tag (or even “category”) “podcast”, and each podcast is tagged with its own identifier, too, so you can find this one by searching for the tag “podcast-14”.

  1. javan-warty-pig is a fuzzer for Java. Basically, a fuzzer generates lots of potential inputs for a test; for example, if you were going to write a test to parse a number, well, you’d generate inputs like empty text, or “this is a test” or various numbers, and you’d expect that your tests would validate errors or demonstrate compliance to number conversion (this is a way of saying “it would parse the numbers.”) A Fuzzer generates this sort of thing largely randomly, and is a good way of really stressing the inputs for the methods; the fuzzer has no regard for boundary conditions, so it’s usually a good way of making sure you’ve covered cases. The question, therefore, becomes: would you use a fuzzer, or HAVE you used a fuzzer? Do you even see the applicability of such a tool? There’s no doubt that it can be useful, but potential doesn’t mean that the potential will be leveraged.

  2. Simon Levermann, mentioned last week for having released pwhash, wrote up an article for the channel blog detailing its use and reason for existing. Thank you, Simon!

  3. Scala is in a complex fight to overthrow Java, from DZone. Is the author willing to share the drugs they’re on? Scala’s been getting a ton of public notice lately – it’s like the Scala advocates finally figured out that everything Scala brought to the table, Kotlin does better, and with far less toxicity. If kotlin wanted to take aim at Scala, there’d be no contest – Kotlin would win immediately, unless “used in Spark and Kafka” were among the criteria for deciding a winner. It’s a fair criterion, though, honestly; Spark and Kafka are in fairly wide deployment. But Scala is incidental for them, and chances are that their developers would really rather have used something a lot more kind to them, like Kotlin, rather than Scala.

  4. More of the joys of having a super-rapid release cycle in Java: according to a post on the openjdk mailing list, bugs marked as critical are basically being ignored because the java 9 project is being shuttered. It’s apparently on to Java 10. This is going to take some getting used to. It’s good to have the new features, I guess, after wondering for years if Java would get things like lambdas, multiline strings, and so forth, but the rapid abandonment of releases before we even have a chance to see widespread adoption of the runtimes is… strange.

  5. James Ward posted Open Sourcing “Get You a License”, about a tool that allows you to pull up licenses for an entire github organization – and issue pull requests that automatically add a license for the various projects that need one. Brilliant idea. Laziness is the brother of invention, that’s what Uncle Grandpa always said.

JavaChannel’s Interesting Links podcast, episode 13

Welcome to the thirteenth ##java podcast. It’s Tuesday, January 30, 2018. Your hosts are Joseph Ottinger (dreamreal on IRC) and Andrew Lombardi (kinabalu on IRC) from Mystic Coders. We have a guest this podcast: Cedric Beust, who’s always been very active in the Java ecosystem, being a factor in Android and author of TestNG as well as JCommander and other tools – and it’s fair to say that if you’ve used modern technology, Cedric’s actually had something to do with it. Really.
As always, this podcast is basically interesting content pulled from various sources, and funneled through the ##java IRC channel on freenode. You can find the show notes at the channel’s website, at javachannel.org; you can find all of the podcasts using the tag (or even “category”) “podcast”, and each podcast is tagged with its own identifier, too, so you can find this one by searching for the tag “podcast-13”.
A topic of discussion from ##java last week centers on code coverage: what numbers are “good”? What numbers can be expected? What’s a good metric to consider? Joseph likes (apparently) absurdly high numbers, like 90% or higher; Cedric recommends 50% code coverage as a good baseline; Andrew targets 70%. Expect a poll in the channel on this! It’s a really good discussion, but it’s not really going to be summarized here; listen to the podcast!

  1. Grizzly – an HTTP server library based on NIO – has been donated to EE4J. That’s not particularly interesting in and of itself, but there’s a question of whether all the projects being donated to EE4J imply an abandonment of Java EE as a container stack. It may not be; after all, EE4J is an umbrella just like Java EE itself is, so this may be very much what we should expect – which makes pointing it out as news rather odd. (The original item was from Reddit.)

  2. Pivotal gave us a really interesting article, called “Understanding When to use RabbitMQ or Apache Kafka.” Kafka and RabbitMQ are both sort of message-oriented, but there’s a lot of confusion about when you’d use one against the other; this article discusses both RabbitMQ’s and Kafka’s strengths and weaknesses. It would have been nicer to talk about AMQP as opposed to RabbitMQ, but the article works nonetheless. Kafka is a high-performance message streaming library; it’s not transactional in the traditional sense; it’s incredibly fast. AMQP is slower (but still really fast, make no mistake) and provides traditional pub/sub and point to point messaging models. The main point of the article, though, is that if you need something other than a traditional model, Kafka is there… but it’s going to involve some effort.

  3. Gradle 4.5 has been released. It’s supposedly faster than it was, and has improvements for C/C++ programmers. It also has better documentation among other changes; Gradle’s good, and this release is important, but it’s not earth-shattering. This discussion veered off quickly and sharply to Cedric’s homegrown build tool, kobalt – and mentioned Eclipse’ Aether library, since migrated to Apache under the maven-resolver project.

  4. More Java 9 shenanigans: Java EE modules – including CORBA, specifically – aren’t part of the unnamed module in Java 9. This comes to us courtesy of InfoQ, which pointed out CORBA specifically – CORBA being harder to reach isn’t really a big deal, I’d think, because nobody’s intentionally dealt with it who hasn’t absolutely had to. And it’s not really a Java EE module, really, so pointing out the removal along with Java EE is accurate but misleading. What does this mean? Well, if you’re using one of the nine modules removed, you’re likely to have to include flags at compilation and runtime to make these modules visible for your app. (See http://openjdk.java.net/jeps/320 for the actual Java Enhancement Proposal.)

  5. There’s a Java Enhancement Proposal for multiline strings. It’s in draft, but has Brian Goetz’ support; this is one of those features that Java doesn’t have that’s left people wondering why for a long time, I think – every other JVM language seems to include it. This doesn’t come up very often – if it was actually all that critical it would have been done a long time ago – but it’ll be nice to see it when (and if) it does make it into Java. It’s done with backticks; it does not use interpolation. Interesting, though.

  6. Baeldung has an article called “The Trie Data Structure in Java,” which, well, presents a Trie. It’s a good article, and explains the data structure really well – but doesn’t explain why you’d use a Trie as opposed to some other similar data structures. Tries represent a tradeoff between data size and speed; Tries tend to be incredibly fast while being more memory-hungry than some of their counterparts. Incidentally: there’s a question of pronunciation! “Trie” is typically pronounced the same was as “tree” is – while Joe pronounces it like “try” and struggled mightily to concede to peer pressure and say “tree.” Naturally, he was inconsistent about it; early pronunciation was in fact like “try” but, as stated, convention says “tree.” And it is a tree structure…

  7. Simon Levermann, sonOfRa on the channel, published a reference to his new pwhash project, a result of a series of discussions that seem to have gone on for a few weeks on the channel. It’s a password hashing library; it provides a unified interface to a set of hashing algorithms, like argon2 and bcrypt.

JavaChannel’s Interesting Links podcast, episode 12

Welcome to the twelfth ##java podcast. Your hosts are Joseph Ottinger, dreamreal on the IRC channel, and Andrew Lombardi (kinabalu on IRC) from Mystic Coders. It’s Tuesday, January 23, 2018.
As always, this podcast is basically interesting content pulled from various sources, and funneled through the ##java IRC channel on freenode. You can find the show notes at the channel’s website, at javachannel.org; you can find all of the podcasts using the tag (or even “category”) “podcast”, and each podcast is tagged with its own identifier, too, so you can find this one by searching for the tag “podcast-12”.
Not an “interesting link,” but we discuss data formats – JSON, XML, HOCON, YAML, Avro, protobuff, Thrift…

  1. Java 9.0.4 has been released, as part of the scheduled January update. NOTE: This is the final planned release for JDK 9. This is scary; see also Azul’s post, “Java: Stable, Secure and Free. Choose Two out of Three,” which points out that with Java’s new rapid-release schedule, you’re going to have to be out of date, insecure, or financially on the hook to … someone to keep up with security releases. We’ve been wanting new features in Java for a long time; we’ve been wanting more churn in the JVM, too. Looks like we, as an ecosystem, might get to experience what Scala goes through every few months, except at least we have the option of stability somewhere.

  2. Speaking of Scala, we have “10 reasons to Learn Scala Programming Language.” It actually has some decent points to make… but makes them with Scala. That’s dumb. There’s nothing that Scala really offers you that Kotlin doesn’t, and that’s assuming Java 8 and Java 9’s improvements don’t turn your crank themselves. It’s almost got a point with Spark and Kafka (well, it mentions Spark, Play, and Akka, and I’m going to pretend that the author meant to say “Kafka” instead), but… when that’s your real lever for learning a language, it’s time to admit that the language was a mistake.

  3. DZone: “Java 8: Oogway’s Advice on Optional” is yet another attempt to justify Optional in Java. It has a fair point to make: “Optional is not a replacement for the null check. Rather, it tries to tell the caller about the nature of the returned value and implicitly reminds the caller to handle the absent cases.” But … okay. So what? In the end, you still have to write what is effectively pretty simple code, and adding the semantic turns out in practice to mostly add noise to your code without actually making it any better.

  4. DZone: “An Introduction to Hollow Jars”, which I found fascinating but I don’t know why. A “hollow jar” is apparently a deployment mechanism where you have two deployable components: the main one, the “hollow jar” basically has the other component – which is the actual application code – in its classpath, and serves to invoke the entry point of the application. The invoker would theoretically change very rarely, and therefore could be baked into a docker image or some other base image, and the component that changes more often would be soft-loaded at runtime.

JavaChannel's Interesting Links podcast, episode 11

Welcome to the eleventh ##java podcast. I’m Joseph Ottinger, dreamreal on the IRC channel, and it’s Tuesday, 2018 January 16. Andrew Lombardi (kinabalu on IRC) from Mystic Coders is also on the podcast, and this episode has a special guest, Kirk Pepperdine from Kodewerk.
As always, this podcast is basically interesting content pulled from various sources, and funneled through the ##java IRC channel on freenode. You can find the show notes at the channel’s website, at javachannel.org; you can find all of the podcasts using the tag (or even “category”) “podcast”, and each podcast is tagged with its own identifier, too, so you can find this one by searching for the tag “podcast-11”.
This podcast has a lot to say about Meltdown, courtesy of Kirk – who’s a performance expert and one of the people you go to when you really need to figure out what your Java application is doing. The short version is this: Meltdown and Spectre are going to affect everything, due to the way modern CPUs work (listen to the podcast to figure out why – it’s fascinating!) – and Java’s reputation as the environment where you can code and let the JVM magically fix everything for you may be in danger. Intel may have revived the importance of data structures for the JVM singlehandedly – not a bad thing, necessarily, but something Java programmers might have to get used to again.
Kirk also went into the things that make Java 9 worth using – and it’s not modules. It’s the extended APIs and the packaging support, neither of which get mentioned very much because of all the chatter about modules.
The interesting links for this week:

  1. DZone has been putting out a lot of information regarding Java 9’s modules. Up first is “Java 9 Modules Introduction (Part 1)“, which does a pretty good job of walking through Java 9 modules from the basics on up. It’s all command-line based, so no IDE, no Maven, no Gradle – Part 2 promises integration with tooling. But knowing what the tools do is important, so this article is a good introduction, about as good as any other so far.

  2. Another entry from DZone on Java 9 is “Java 9 Module Services”, which could be written to be more clear – it refers to a source repository instead of showing lots of relevant code – but does walk through the old ServiceLoader stuff and then walks through the same mechanism in Java 9.

  3. Speaking of tooling: Baeldung has done a walkthrough of docker-java-api, providingi a guide to a Java client that interfaces with the Docker daemon, providing programmatic management of images, volumes, and networks.

  4. There’s also resilience4j, a fault-tolerance library inspired by Netflix Hystrix.It provides features for limited retries, transaction management, a number of other such things; I haven’t run into a situation where I’ve needed this (transaction management has been enough, generally) but it looks like it might be useful; maybe I’ve made architectural decisions that allow me to avoid using libraries like this because I didn’t want to write the features myself. Maybe if I’d known about this, my choices would be different… hard to say.

  5. Lastly, there’s little-java-functions, a collection of functions that look pretty useful, although not modular at all. This library covers a lot of ground. The lack of modularity probably works against it; since we’ve mentioned Java 9 so much, it’d be nice if it mentioned Java 9 compatibility with modules, but maybe Java isn’t prepared to go that far down the Scala rabbit-hole yet. In the process of recording this, a potential problem with licenses came up – possibly the subject of a future conversation – and the author ended up explicitly licensing the code under Creative Commons, thanks to Andrew.